Anyway, what we have here is Chicago’s version of a political catch-22. Any politician with the name and standing to take on a powerful mayor knows it’s crazy to take on a powerful mayor. And since no voter wants to vote for a crazy person, they vote for mayors whose policies they don’t like—which is even nuttier than voting for a crazy person.
That brings me back to Jane Byrne, because there are a few parallels between the Chicago of today and the one that existed in 1978 when she announced her bid for mayor.

Ben Joravsky wonders if political-nobody Jane Byrne could unseat a powerful incumbent back then, could someone—anyone—beat Mayor Rahm Emanuel in 2015?

Anyway, what we have here is Chicago’s version of a political catch-22. Any politician with the name and standing to take on a powerful mayor knows it’s crazy to take on a powerful mayor. And since no voter wants to vote for a crazy person, they vote for mayors whose policies they don’t like—which is even nuttier than voting for a crazy person.

That brings me back to Jane Byrne, because there are a few parallels between the Chicago of today and the one that existed in 1978 when she announced her bid for mayor.

Ben Joravsky wonders if political-nobody Jane Byrne could unseat a powerful incumbent back then, could someone—anyone—beat Mayor Rahm Emanuel in 2015?

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